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www.woodworkweb.com : A quick and easy way of making excellent quality picture frames in your own workshop, read the full article at the link above.

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25 Responses to “Woodworking – Making Picture Frames on a Tablesaw”

  1. jrrobinson1313 says:

    I was just wondering how to figure out the stop. Since one end is longer than the other, how to you know know where to put it? Does your stop have an angle on it or is it 90 degrees with your straight board?

  2. knecht105 says:

    Look up: lap joints picture frames in Google and also click on images to see the many variations. I have made lap joint frames in the past and they look great.
    Thanks for asking …
    Colin

  3. Jameson Brown says:

    Thank you for the advice. I will be making some frames this weekend. So, with the overlap, they will have sort of a ridge at each corner, or what do you mean by overlap?

    I’m not very well versed with woodwork and hand-crafted construction, although I have worked band saws and other saws before in various high school and college shop classes.

    I have several big picture frame projects ahead and I don’t want to screw them up :)

  4. knecht105 says:

    If you don’t have the tools, making picture frames from wood would be a bit more challenging for sure. I am not aware of any place the sells the “plys of wood that are pre cut”. You could, as an alternative, make different style frames where the corners overlap one another rather than meeting at 45 degrees. These are easier to make and can still look great. It would still need some cutting but could be easily done with hand tools.
    Hope this helps, thanks for posting
    Colin

  5. Jameson Brown says:

    Is there a place where I can just buy pre-cut plys of wood in order to put together for picture frames? I don’t have any laser guided saws or precision saws. I would have to cut it at 46 and then try and sand off a degree on each side and hopefully not have it become uneven.

  6. knecht105 says:

    Thanks for your comment and concern. I did go back and look at the cuts, and you are right, from the front angle, it does like there is a risk of injury. What you can’t see very well is that the blade height is very low and that at the finish of the cut my arm is not really in danger. I hind-sight a top view of the cut or even a different angel would have shown it better. This shows me we need to be more aware of our camera angles, and always aware of safety.
    Thanks again
    Colin

  7. exotiquerobert says:

    I cringed almost every time I saw you making your cuts!!! your right arm could have been really HACKED if you slipped moving your piece towards the rotating blade is NOT smart. think about it. Sure the motion is fine, but the positioning of your right arm is dangerous as hell … just my two cents…. LOOK at the video carefully and you will see what I am talking about (hopefully) … just sayin …

  8. knecht105 says:

    Yes, you are right. There is such a variety of frame materials. You need to know is the “inset” of the frame, then add the thickness of the remaining frame material. No easy way that I know of to do this, maybe others have more experience and will see this and contribute some hints. One way that works great is to use a somewhat general oversize dimension, then cut a matte to inside and picture measurements.

  9. josvanr says:

    nice method BUT…. how do you know *where* to clamp your stop in order to get a frame that wil hold a picture of given dimensions? 99% of the time one needs a frame to hold a picture of given dimensions, not an arbitrary size frame. So one needs to set the *inner* size of the frame somehow….

  10. stikowsky says:

    No: if you are 1 deg of on each corner you make, that equals 8 deg in total

  11. gronvold202 says:

    haha I didnt relize this video is an older one. The new ones are sounding pretty good. As a side, Im really enjoying your videos, they are very helpful.

  12. knecht105 says:

    Thanks for the tip, I will check that. Hopefully I can get this ongoing issue resolved.
    Thanks again …

  13. gronvold202 says:

    The problem with your audio isn’t the microphone. The gain control on your camera is causing your audio to “peak”. The audio recording level needs to be turned down if your camera allows you to do that.

  14. knecht105 says:

    ah yes … my agony with microphones :( I did pick up a shotty, which am using in a couple of the latest vids … not sure I am in love with it, as you have pointed out. I think I need a “real sound guy” to pay me a visit and help me along with this. Any and all suggestions and ideas gratefully accepted … thanks again for your input.

  15. knecht105 says:

    ah yes … my agony with microphones :( I did pick up a shotty, which am using in a couple of the latest vids … not sure I am in love with it, for reason you have pointed out. I think I need a “real sound guy” to pay me a visit one day and help me along with this sound thing. Any and all suggestions and ideas gratefully accepted … thanks again for your input.

  16. knecht105 says:

    ah yes … my agony with microphones :( I did pick up a shotty, which am using in a couple of the latest vids … not sure I am in love with it, as you have pointed out. I think I need a “real sound guy” to pay me a visit and help me along with this. Any and all suggestions and ideas gratefully accepted … thanks again for your input.

  17. victorscope says:

    Whoops… Accidentally hit the send button. I was just going to mention that a shotgun mic might not be ideal for your particular application because their pick up pattern is very narrow. If you used a shotty you would need a boom operator to maintain proper positioning of the mic as you shoot. If you were thinking of placing one on a boom stand you’ll likely end up disapointed with the results because even a little bit of movement will cause you to go out of the mics pick up pattern. For

  18. victorscope says:

    Hello,

  19. knecht105 says:

    Well, for your application … as you indicated in your first message, of using the Kreg Jig, I would think that would be ideal for your application. We did do some “un-official testing for strength on a variety of hardwoods” on the Kreg joints both with and without glue and frankly, we were very impressed with the joints that didn’t even have glue. Thanks again for your observations and ideas, it’s nice to get different perspectives, it helps others too.

  20. fergawdsache says:

    Thanks for the fast response, the frames i intend to make will be covered by the canvas itself so should not be visible, i am just trying to work out ways to speed up frame making and canvas strectching, and was just unsure why corners were mitred

  21. knecht105 says:

    Yes I do have the Kreg Jig, and yes it could be used for making frames. As you mention, it is a visual look and it depends how you want to present your art work. I have also seen some beautiful frames made our of old barn wood where the corners are lap joints that overlap irregularly so there are many many ways of making frames.
    Thanks for your questions, it helps to enlighten all of us :)
    Colin

  22. fergawdsache says:

    I see you have a kreg jig, cant picture frames be made with that, why do they need to be mitred corners, is it just a visual thing ?.

  23. knecht105 says:

    Well … yes, I’m sure it is. I’m not sure how off hand. Getting the perfect angle is only half the battle you also have to have both rails and both styles EXACTLY the same length, If one rail is even a tiny bit longer than the other rail, you won’t get a perfect fit. Same with the styles, if one style is even a tiny bit longer than the other the fit will be off. So, if you can design some sort of a “stop” on your mitre fence to set the lengths, that should work. Let us know how you make out :)

  24. TheForwardGaze says:

    Could this be done with a miter saw?

  25. vikasparmar24 says:

    nice video for the info

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