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A Novel Approach to Inlay Combining Marquetry and Router Inlay Kit Part 2 of the Inlay Series was divided in half for posting on YouTube. Be sure to check out both parts (Part 2a & 2b)! I am enjoying a chance to finally get back into the shop after a busy summer. This series shows a method I worked out to inlay an veneer aspen leaf motif. The technique combines methods from marquetry with a router inlay kit and hardboard template. This episode continues the Inlay Series by demonstrating how to make the veneer packet using lightweight bookbinder’s sheet cardboard available from an art store and veneer from my small veneer collection. Please bear with me as I shot this footage while working in between the tripod legs and watching the small monitor screen on the camera! The Folding Rule foldingrule.blogspot.com

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A Novel Approach to Inlay Combining Marquetry and Router Inlay Kit Part 2 of the Inlay Series was divided in half for posting on YouTube. Be sure to check out both parts (Part 2a & 2b)! I am enjoying a chance to finally get back into the shop after a busy summer. This series shows a method I worked out to inlay an veneer aspen leaf motif. The technique combines methods from marquetry with a router inlay kit and hardboard template. This episode continues the Inlay Series by demonstrating how to make the veneer packet using lightweight bookbinder’s sheet cardboard available from an art store and veneer from my small veneer collection. Please bear with me as I shot this footage while working in between the tripod legs and watching the small monitor screen on the camera! The Folding Rule foldingrule.blogspot.com
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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Your Questions About Woodworking Tools



William asks…

Wiring to a work shop?

What size wire do I need for service to a workshop. I will need to go through attic and under ground. Total about 130 ft.. I will need to run a 30 amp Rv traveltrailer and small woodworking tools; table,mitre saw,small a/c, light,etc. Thank you

Denny answers:

For a basic workshop, I usually recommend a 60 amp sub panel. #6 copper or #4 aluminum is usually adequate (if you use TW or UF conductors you would need to increase the wire size by one standard size). While the size would be more than adequate for your current anticipated use, you would have plenty of reserve for possible expansion in the future without worrying about overloading the system.

Mary asks…

i have an 18v delta battery woodworking pack: drill,circular saw,brad nailer,jig saw. I can’t find parts .?

can’t find batteries or a replacement charger for these tools. is there any compatible battery that can be substituted?

Denny answers:

Here’s the Delta/Porter Cable web site: http://www.deltaportercable.com/

Mandy asks…

woodworking help…?

I really want to get into woodworking/carving, especially carving cool pieces of wood with a dremmel tool. Space is limited in the garage and stuff. any tips on getting started?

Denny answers:

Take a 2×2 board 8 feet long, draw on it to look like chain links. Remove everything that isn’t part of the chain. Whittle the links apart as you go. When you get done you will have a very unique wooden chain. I have seen them sell for a lot. When you get done post again and I will give you instructions on the next step. Be patient this is very time consuming

Betty asks…

how do i convince my dad to turn his shed into a workshop?

hey, I am a 12 year old boy who loves woodworking and i have heaps of tools, i have been wanting to save up for my own shed but they are too damn expensive… and we already have a shed but it is full of crap that half of it we don’t even need anymore, if he said yes i would clean it for him and stuff, even if i only got half of the shed it would still be enough. how do i convince him, he is a tough cookie to crack too… thanks

Denny answers:

Well, for starters, I know exactly where you’re at. You see, I started my woodworking at 11 years old to now being a master woodworker by trade. In my beginning, I to had a very stubborn father who liked to do things only his way or no way. We had this back room in the house that always seemed to be cluttered with stuff that no one ever used. You know, junk…The problem that I was facing is my father really never knew at the time how much interest and actually how creative I could be with the various woodworking projects that most would suspect a grown-up to have done. Like you, I was convinced that my dad wasn’t going to really cooperate with me by granting me the privilege of transforming this “junk” room, into a useful, learning environment. So this is what I did. I first cleaned the room in its entirety, paying close attention to what was actually garbage & what was not…I simply tossed all the garbage on trash day & as far as the remaining, “junk”, I built some storage cabinets out of some scrap lumber & stored this remaining clutter nice & neatly inside. I was able to attain 75% of the room for a efficient, workshop environment. I was still skeptical on my father’s reaction prior to the unveiling of my efforts. Would you believe that not only was he overwhelmed, in a good way, but he financed the remainder of $ to help build the necessary workbench & remaining storage cabinets to make this shop complete. I’m not saying that this is the solution, but it could be part of the recipe… By what you have already mentioned about your interests in a hobby shop, you’re on the right track…However, your choice of words seems to be a little distasteful for your age. I only mention this because when I was your age, if I were to ever say any kind of four letter word, I would have gotten punished in a physical way, which was severely wrong at the time & I highly disapprove. Please take this advice for what it ‘s worth, because the best thing about it is….It’s Free!!!
Take care & I wish you the very best in your bright future….Oh, & one last thing, No matter what, “Always measure twice & cut once”…You’ll see……………………………………………………………………………………………….

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Your Questions About Carpentry Tools



Ruth asks…

Do you think Jesus as a tradesman could have been suffering from heavy metal poisoning after coming into?

contact with Lead and Mercury during the manufacture of nails, fastners and carpentry tools?
Heavy metal poisoning was common in the Roman era and a common cause of madness and delusion.
Occupational heath and saftey wasn’t as big an issue as it is today.

Dusty answers:

Yeah i think the nails and fasteners from his Crucifixion were real. But was only 33 when he dead so it is very unlike to poisoning!

What about the church was that crush and cursed by the simultaneous earth quake!

Mark asks…

Please help my 6th grader with the following question: She would like to know the steps to solve.?

Saul is helping his brother Jason do carpentry and general repair jobs. jason gave Saul some money for supplies. Saul bought some tools for $20.80, and then spent one half of what was left for wood. He spent one third of what was left after that on paint and another third on buckets and brushes, and he returned with $13.20. How much money did Jason give Saul.

Dusty answers:

13.20 Is what was returned. And according to you he spent 2/3 of the one half that was left after spending 20.80 on different things. So 13.20$ is one third of the half that was left. So 13.20 x 3 = 39.60. 39.60 Would be the half that was left after spending 20.80 on the tools.So 39.60 x 2 = 79.20 + 20.80 = 100$. Jason gave saul 100$ to purchase supplies.

Linda asks…

what is the best cage material for snake terrarium/vivarium?

i wanna try my hand at building a snake enclosure. im excellent with tools/carpentry/mechanics so it’ll be pretty simple

i need something that is about 3/4-1″ thick for a good tight hold. i was thinking of melamine but it doesnt do well with humidity and silicone doesnt adhere to it well.

plywood is out of the question… how about plastics? such as pvc and polyurethane?

i dont know… must be sturdy enough to last 10+ years and hold its own weight x5 (want to build a stackable cage) light and hold heat+humidity… money is a slight issue but i dont want to take the cheap route…

gotta be easy to clean, waterproof and like i said sturdy enough for me to build on itself. and fairly easy to come by and not $100 a sq foot if u know what i mean

btw the cages will be 36x18x18 and 18x18x12, (length/depth/height)
let me know! this is for cornsnakes/ball pythons/kingsnakes thanks!

Dusty answers:

3/4 inch Oak plywood is a great choice for a do-it-yourself cage. You can stain this any color you wish. Seal all the seams inside the cage with pure silicone sealant (aquarium safe variety) and then paint the entire inside of the cage with Dry-Lok paint. This is sold as a waterproofing paint for basement and retaining walls. Rough sand the wood and then apply 2-3 coats of this paint. Let it air out until you can no longer smell the paint. Then put your doors on. I like to use Optix acrylic. Nice and tough and doesn’t scratch quite as easily as standard plexiglass. You can also cut this with a fine toothed blade in a table saw. Just go slowly and let the saw do the work. It will stink, but it gets the job done.

Personally, I’d go with 36X24X18. You’ll have a bit less waste with the plywood and the extra depth is appreciated by the snakes. To make sure you don’t have binding issues with a stack, a 2X2 header around the top of the cage would give it more strength. I also can’t recommend highly enough putting wheels on the bottom cage in the stack. It makes moving to retrieve dropped objects and to clean much easier. You also want a bit of air space between the cages. If you use radiant heat panels, which I highly recommend for this material, you’ll want that airspace to insure that the panel on the next cage down doesn’t bleed heat into the floor of the cage above it. If you have a table saw, or access to one, you can rip 2X2′s down to 1X2′s…these make great spacers. With 18″ cage height and an inch of airspace between the cages, you will want to stop at 4 high. This will produce a stack 6’4″ high, not counting the wheels, which would push the top of the stack to just over 6’6″. Unless you are very tall, there will be an issue accessing, and especially cleaning, the top cage.

Betty asks…

Fraternity Big Bro Paddle – Snowboard? Ideas Please?

Ok so I got my big bro last night and we are both really into snowboarding. Little bros are required to get their big bro a paddle, and the big bro buys the little bro his first letters. For the paddle, I’d love to be able to incorporate snowboarding into it, but don’t know how. Ideally I’d love to have the large part of the paddle literally be a mini snowboard, and have the handle be a rail or something. Please give me ideas! I’m in college and don’t have access to carpentry machines/tools. 10 points best answer + thumbs up

Dusty answers:

Buy a really shi/tty old snowboard, or just use one of yours (if you have more than one) and cut it into the shape of a paddle,

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