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Posts Tagged ‘detail’



A wood router for detail work. Learn how to adjust the corner base a laminate trimmer in this free woodworking video from an expert carpenter. Expert: Slawek Hadziewicz Contact: www.designerwoodconcepts.com Bio: Slawomir “Slawek” Hadziewicz has worked for a wood shop since 1997. He owns his own wood shop in Clearwater, Florida called Designer Wood Concepts. Filmmaker: Adolph Ramirez

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Your Questions About Carpentry Tools



Mary asks…

How does someone make an egress window from an existing window in a basement?

My husband, his dad, and my dad have quite a bit of carpentry, construction, and concrete knowledge and skills. We need to make an egress out of an existing window in our basement in order to make another bedroom down there. We also have access to a lot of tools because my father-in-law is assistant manager at a local True Value store and they have lots of large tools that they rent out. We want to do this ourselves. We have to remove the existing window and make the opening bigger to put in a larger window. We would need to dig out some the land beside the house to have access to the window. I did check with codes in our area and found out the window opening would need to be 4ft x 4ft to be legal and up to code. Our basement walls are made of hollow concrete block from when the house was built in 1930. How would we go about doing this and what tools and other materials would we need?
I haven’t discussed this with my husband or fathers yet. I have just been doing some research on this to figure out if we can do it ourselves to save money or if we are going to hire someone to do it for us.
My husband, dad, and father-in-law are still capable of doing manual labor

Dusty answers:

They probably know what is involved. U have to cut out the foundation with a saw that mounts to the wall to cut a straight line. Then u have to place a frame in the opening. You also have to dig out enough dirt to allow access. U will need either a preformed outside well or make one yourself from cement block. I was talking to a contractor the other day about this kind of project and he estimated a 3 to 4 thousand dollar job to have it done.

Sandy asks…

Funny or not?

A lady places an ad in her local supermarket looking for a handyman.
The next day, a bloke knocks on the door.
G’day Lady, I’m here about the job.”
“Can you paint,” she asks?
“No, I have bad sinuses and the fumes make me sick.”
“Well, could you clean my spouts out then,” she asks?
“No, sorry, I have vertigo, can’t stand heights.”
“OK, what about mowing then?”
“No, can’t mow, I get hayfever.”
“What about carpentry, can you do that?”
“No, I’m afraid not, I have bad arthritis in my wrists, can’t use tools at all without great pain.”
“Seems to me,” says the Lady, “You don’t have much going for you, so why do you think you’re handy?”
“I live around the corner…..”

Dusty answers:

What? I think that’s a crappy joke!! “Haha!! So Witty!! Handy! Around the corner!! Indeed!!” It SUCKS!! Sorry, but it does!

Donald asks…

Do they ever show electrical wiring projects on DIY shows on TV?

I’ve seen a lot of shows lately on the DIY channel and HGTV, and even on local PBS where they show in detail a carpentry project (installing a door, or finish carpentry). They describe in detail (about a 20-minute segment) all the steps they’re doing, the tools and materials they’re using, etc. But I’ve never seen that with an electrical project, other than a 2-minute segment where they replace an existing switch or outlet or hang a ceiling fan. I’ve never seen a 20-minute segment that details a new circuit actually being installed, including installing boxes, running wires, and making connections (including the ones in the main service panel).

Dusty answers:

They don’t bother covering it in too much depth because there are a lot of electrical codes to contend with depending on where you live. There are basics that are true in most cases such as the gauge of wire or number of outlets on a circuit but different localities have different requirements. Even licensed electricians run up against issues from town to town. Every electrical inspector has his own preferences.

I like doing electrical work but I spent a few years working as a helper in construction. What I like about electrical work is that it is cleaner and more straight forward than other types of work. But you really need to know what you are doing and have the proper tools.

Below are a slew of How To videos.

*

Richard asks…

how to start a business?

I want to start my own carpentry business, where do I start? I know I will need all my own tools and transport, but how do I all the legal side of things like insurance, tax, do I need permission to start a buisness?
I have a good job working for someone and I’m terrorfied of taking this next step.
my boss is not too friendly so advice from him is not going to happen.
how do I even get work
sorry there are just too many questions to get my head round.
help
thanks brutus, Im living in Ireland so advise on uk or Irish business would be great

Dusty answers:

Http://www.score.org and http://www.sba.gov are 2 great places to start your informationi search.

Being terrified and having “just too many questions” are great signs that say you care about this enough to want to do things right.

Yes, thinking about starting your own business CAN be the most terrifying process. It’s scary because we are breaking free of our comfort zone. Like it of not, our jobs have always been our safety net.

I went through that phase over 5 years ago when the company I worked for went bust and they were laying off staff. My wife and I decided that even though it would be tough, we just HAD to take control of our own destiny. So we decided to start our own home based food delivery business.

In many ways, we were in the same boat as you are right now. We had ZERO knowledge about running a business. We only knew my wife was a fantastic cook – just like you may have minimal knowledge right now, but you know that you have the ONE critical skill you need – carpentry.

Anyway, here’s a couple of things you can do to help you learn the ropes as you prepare for the big move :

- If it’s possible in any way, take note of how your boss does things. There are lots of ways you can do this : be friendly with his customers and have a casual chat, learn from the sales and marketing staff, accounting staff etc.

- Find out where he is getting his supplies from. Very often, this just means you keep and eye out for the delivery truck or van, and take note of the address and contact number. Then check them out.

- Start to ask your friends and family if they have carpentry jobs that you can do. Work at these jobs over the weekends or in the evenings.

- As you learn to handle accounts (jobs) on your own, strat thinking of upgrading your equipment and workshop. You can do this slowly. Other than preparing you for taking on bigger jobs, this also helps assure you mentally that you are capable of running things ON YOUR OWN.

I leave you with a valuable lesson I’ve learnt from a lady who sells noodles near where I live. She says she has only ONE skill in this world – making noodles – and she does it well. She’s done it for almost thirty years and managed to put her 4 kids through college. For as long as I can remember, she’s been sellling noodles. She may have started out living in a shack, but she now owns 3 homes and 2 cars. Her secret : Just because you have only one skill, use it well, hone it, and live frugally. Many people can do well to learn from her.

So my friend, if you have only one skill in this world and you use it well, you have as much chance of being a huge success as the next guy.

I wish you all the best.

Andrew

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Part two of the ultimate woodworking shop that is virtually dust free. Located in San Diego this amazing shop has been designed with every detail that you can imagine including automatic dust collection, custom-made storage for everything from pens to sand paper and much more.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Come visit with us the ultimate woodworking shop that is virtually dust free. Located in San Diego this amazing shop has been designed with every detail that you can imagine including automatic dust collection, custom-made storage for everything from pens to sand paper and much more. This is Part One of our visit to Tymes unique shop. Stay tuned for Part two next week!
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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How to mud and tape drywall [1of2]



Shannon from www.house-improvements.com shows you how to properly finish (mud and tape) drywall. He describes in detail and shows you how you can do this on your own home projects. This is part 1 of 2 which includes the tools and materials required for the job, and how to apply two coats of drywall compound aka mud. This drywall is green because it is moisture resistant and is being used in a bathroom renovation.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Your Questions About Woodworking Tools



Chris asks…

What kind of woodworking tools do I need to make a body for a guitar?

I’ve never done any woodwork before and need to know the names of some tools. I want to get pretty intricate into detail with it, so any tools that do just that would help the most. Thanks.

Dusty answers:

See grizzly.com for a section that is directed at guitar making.
Meyer

Ruth asks…

What woodworking tools does one need to only build bookcases?

I just want to start building bookcases, and was wondering what tools I would need. I appreciate anyone answering but I am hoping that I will get an answer from a woodworker or experienced person.

Dusty answers:

* 10″ Table saw
* Surface planer
Shaper
* Router with table
* Jointer
* Glue up station with pipe clamps or hydraulic rams
* Palm sanders
Drill press
* Drill
Lathe with follow jig
Scroll saw
* Sliding compound miter saw with clamps and crown stops
Turret style radial arm saw
* Circular saw
* Powered screw driver
* Compressor
* Finish nailing gun
* Pot sprayer/HPLV sprayer/Turbine sprayer
* Spray booth
Various jigs and dies (you will make these as you go)

–EDIT–
I guess you really don’t need all that stuff right off the bat. I’ll put an asterisk by the stuff you will need just to start production.

Helen asks…

is there a dealer in the Glasgow area who would be interested in buying old, second hand woodworking tools.?

these tools include a Stanley No.55 moulding plane with four boxes of cutters, a two jaw chuck wheel brace, a Stanley No.7 plane, a Henry Mathieson plane and a Primus petrol blow lamp.

Dusty answers:

Ebay is a good source takes a little time to set up an account but well worth it there alot of collectors searching for vintage tools and willing to pay good prices for them Good luck

George asks…

I’m looking for a charity who accepts tools (automotive & woodworking) in Phoenix, AZ. Any suggestions?

My father died and kept wonderful care of a lot of useful tools. Chandler area. Woodworking, general home repair, automotive, etc. I would like a reputable organization who could use these as a donation or pass them on to someone who can. Must be able to pick them up.

Dusty answers:

I feel sure that Habitat for Humanity could use them or would know of someone else. There should be a toll-free number in
the yellow pages of your local phone directory. If not, there is a website for information. Bless you for thinking to pass your Dad’s tools on!

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