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Posts Tagged ‘condition’

sharpening a cabinet scraper



How to sharpen a cabinet scraper and keep it in top condition with the least amount of effort, Visit www.furnituremakersapprentice.net for more in-depth info about sharpening woodworking tools

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Duncan Phyfe’s Tool Chest (419)



This is a very famous set of tools. The tools and chest belonged to Duncan Phyfe, one of New Yorks most important cabinet makers between 1790 and 1854. Phyfe was born in Scotland, came to America as a teenager, learned to work with wood, and had a thriving business for four decades. At one time he employed 100 workers. Phyfe built this tool chest, a simple yet beautiful pine box, and amassed this collection of almost 300 woodworking tools for carving, veneering, and inlaying furniture. It includes 60 planes and a variety of chisels, gouges, templates, and squares all in pristine condition. You dont have to be a carpenter to appreciate the collection, especially the beautiful handles that he crafted out of mahogany, rosewood, and ebony. Note especially the saw handles mounted in the top of the chest. You may be curious about the small white envelope tied with string inside the box. The handwriting on the envelope tells the story. It says: Mothers hair, taken off the morning she died, August 24, 1899, and it marks the the death of Julia Matilda Pinkney, Phyfes daughter-in-law.

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Your Questions About Carpentry Tools



Jenny asks…

explain briefly, the reasons why hand tools should be kept sharp and in good condition.?

carpentry and joinery

Dusty answers:

Sharp tools require less force to be used by the carpenter so they’re easier to use.

Less force also means the tool is less likely to break, hence, the carpenter won’t have to buy new tools so often.

Also, well maintained tools are less likely to injure the carpenter. If the carpenter is injured, that is loss of salary.

John asks…

Cabinet Making/Carpentry?

have there been any advancements in technology for cabinet making in recent years? like glues, tools, machines, finishes etc. and if so, where can i find some information about them?

Dusty answers:

Try woodworking.com.

George asks…

Collecting items for no reason? ?

My partner (61) has filled every corner of the house with “things” she treasures, but never, ever uses: 50 years old dried paint-set, LP records and k7′s from the 60′s (but she has no turn table or tape player), broken umbrellas, broken furnitures, spare lights from a car she has sold 5 years ago, unusable rusted carpentry tools from her grand’dad, 20 years old bank statements and air tickets, and, worst of all, medicines out-of-date by more than 5 years. (As a result, I got deaf for a week, using an outdated ear wax cleaner!)
This covers household goods, furnitures, and even rubish!
She stores in the fridge the two leaves of salad we have not consumed at dinner. I recently found at the back of the fridge a pot of jam dated 1983!!!
Her youth was not easy, and quite poor: she never HAD anything of her own, she never had education past the 6th grade.
I am desperately trying to find out WHY she has that attitude, and how it can be “corrected”. I think that this is leading to very dangerous situations:
- Last summer, she used an out-of-date anti-tique spray on the cat: only the rapid intervention of the vet saved the poor animal!
- She used a wood ladder in bad condition. It broke, she fell and was unable to walk for a week.
- and many more small “accidents”…
Can anyone guide me?
Lion Lady: You hit the spot. It actually IS a compulsive disorder syndrome. I shall find out more.
Gregg: No, I was not there when she broke the ladder. She preferred to use her rotten ladder than the new aluminium one. Her memories? Sorry: once you start living in memories, you are as good as dead. Sure! Memories are nice, but NEW things you do KEEP YOU ALIVE!

Dusty answers:

She is a Hoarder— does not want to get rid of anything, it is a disorder and may need help with it. She needs to see a therapist.

Lisa asks…

What newer hand tools are out .. and what are tools you could use endless amounts of?

My husband always asks for common tools .. for carpentry and auto mechanics work .. He likes “throw away tools” or ones that he loses or breaks .. but I am also looking for newer tools out (got him the black and decker 16 in 1 wrench) .. and also looking for one bigger 100-300 dollar tool that is maybe newer .. because he owns everything .. got him a nice dremel one year and he said he already had two ..

Dusty answers:

Trust me honey, your husband does not have every tool and he needs more and will probbly never have enough lol.

My g/f says the same thing about me. I have about $30,000 worth of tools and she thinks I have ‘everything’… To her suprice I have a list of tools that I still need/want that totals $20,000..

It’s really hard for wives to buy tools her their husbands. I think its sweet, cute and a greatthing but 90% of the time the woman has no idea what he needs or has already, or what to get him.

Best thing you can do is really just ask him for a short list of tools under $300 that he needs or wants. Then just go off that list as to what you should buy him.

Also just as a funny note.. Cant go wrong with 1/2″, 9/16″, 13mm, 14mm, 15mm sockets or wrenchs. Those are some of the most common sizes and all of use wants more than 1 of each of those.. I’m always looking for one of those sizes that grew legs and ran away from ‘tool jail’

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Your Questions About Wood Crafting Tools



George asks…

Will someone proofread this for grammar mistakes..?

commas, subject verb agreement, anything you see would be greatly appreciated. I feel like i used AND so much and dont know when it needs a comma or is there is another way to re-word my sentence.

Prater’s Mill is a historic site in Varnell, Georgia. It was built by Benjamin Franklin Prater in 1855 and became part of the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. Twice a year, Prater’s Mill has a festival that consists of many different events and exhibits. During these festivals, demonstrations are held to display exactly how the mill was used in the past. Tours are also given around the plantation to show how flour was made and other things like blacksmithing, quilting, and wood carvings. These festivals help keep the history of Prater’s Mill alive by passing its history down from generation to generation in a fun, but effective way.
All of the proceeds that are received from the festivals go towards keeping the site in its original condition after typical wear and tear over the years. Although the festivals are only held twice, the site is frequently used for fishing, annual cookouts, and even weddings. The Coahulla Creek runs along side of the mill and was known to help the Cherokee Indians run the mill as a whole to produce flour and/or grain. Since electricity was not available, Prater’s Mill being ran by the creek sometimes played as a disadvantage. When the creek would overflow, the majority of the buildings were damaged. Thanks to volunteers taking part in the preservation, the mill is still standing and in unbelievable condition.
Prater’s Mill not only survived many floods and fires, but was even a campsite for the soldiers during the Civil War. The reason it was not destroyed is because both sides of the army saw this location as a valuable resource for food and shelter. Before the war, Benjamin Prater began to see the popularity of the mill growing. He soon decided to add a cotton gin, a saw mill, a wool carder, a general store, and a blacksmith shop all of which are displayed at the festivals to this day.
I consider Prater’s Mill much like a mini town. It is overall a large plantation, but is divided in two by a road ran through the middle. The cotton gin, saw mill, and wool carder are on one side and separated into buildings. During the tour, they will show how each of these items worked and why people depended on them so much. Also during the festival, this is where the majority of the arts and crafts booths set up. The general store and blacksmith shop are located across the street. Tools from 1855 are displayed and demonstrations are shown how they were used. It is like a blast from the past with all the mountain music, history exhibits, southern food, and handmade crafts.
The things shown at Prater’s Mill may not look like much use today, but back then they were something everyone was grateful to have. It all made life for the Indians so much easier and was convenient for the soldiers during the war. Who knew something of such importance and with so much history could be just down the street? I find it amazing how these buildings have been standing since 1855, but are still respected and taken care of like it was built yesterday. As long as Prater’s Mill continues to stand, the festivals will continue and so will the history.

Dusty answers:

Not bad but I have made a number of revisions. Here is my version

Prater’s Mill is a historic site in Varnell, Georgia. It was built by Benjamin Franklin Prater in 1855 and became part of the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. Twice a year, Prater’s Mill has a festival that consists of many different events and exhibits including demonstrations that show how the mill was used in the past. Tours are also given around the plantation to show how flour was made and other activities like blacksmithing, quilting, and wood carving. These festivals help keep the history of Prater’s Mill alive by passing its history down from generation to generation in a fun, and effective way.

All of the proceeds that are received from the festivals go towards keeping the site in its original condition after typical wear and tear over the years. Although the festivals are only bi-annual, the site is also frequently used for fishing, annual cookouts, and even weddings. The Coahulla Creek runs along side of the mill and was known to help the Cherokee Indians run the mill to produce flour and/or grain since electricity was not available. Using the creek to run the mill was sometimes a disadvantage since, when the creek would overflow, the majority of the buildings near it were damaged.

Prater’s Mill not only survived many floods and fires, but it served as a campsite for the soldiers during the Civil War. It was not destroyed because both sides saw this location as a valuable resource for food and shelter. Before the war, Benjamin Prater began to see the popularity of his mill growing. He soon decided to add a cotton gin, a saw mill, a wool carder, a general store, and a blacksmith shop, all of which operate at the festivals to this day.

Thanks to volunteers taking part in the preservation, the mill is still standing and in unbelievable condition. Prater’s Mill is much like a mini-town but it is essentially a large plantation divided in two by a road that runs through the middle. The cotton gin, saw mill, and wool carder are on one side and are located in separate buildings. During the tour, the operation of the equipment shows why people depended on it so much. Also during the festival, many arts and crafts booths are set up. The general store and blacksmith shop are located across the street. Tools from 1855 are displayed and demonstrations on their use are given. It is like a step back in history with all the mountain music, history exhibits, southern food, and handmade crafts for visitors to enjoy.

The equipment preserved shown at Prater’s Mill may not look useful today, but back then it was something everyone was grateful to have. It all made life for the Indians so much easier and was convenient for the soldiers during the Civil War. A site of such importance and with so much history could be just down the street? It is remarkable that the buildings still stand thanks to the outstanding efforts of many caring volunteers. As long as Prater’s Mill continues to stand, the festivals will continue to showcase the mill’s history.

Linda asks…

I have just moved to the San Antonia area, will someone hire me?, I willing to learn and work hard.?

I have done factory work my whole life, would really like to get into Toyota. I have miminal experience in carpentry but feel I’m a quick learner and am willing to learn. The work I’ve performed in the past has been’ shot blasting steel, cutting steel, grinding steel, also also assembly work from wood furniture to band instruments. Ihave also buffed and polished brass and silver band instruments. I am also a registered basketball official with the state of Michigan but will register here in Texas as well, I have been officiating for 15 yrs. I have also done packaging, inspecting and some fork-lift driving. I enjoy working with hand tools specifically for woodworking which I like to do as a hobby when I can which is a craft I would definately like to improve on because I enjoy doing it. I also have a chauffer’s liscense.

Dusty answers:

You’re in the wrong section…

Mary asks…

I’m new in the area from out of state, will someone hire a 47 yr old who’s willing to work hard?

I have done factory work my whole life, would really like to get into Toyota. I have miminal experience in carpentry but feel I’m a quick learner and am willing to learn. The work I’ve performed in the past has been’ shot blasting steel, cutting steel, grinding steel, also also assembly work from wood furniture to band instruments. Ihave also buffed and polished brass and silver band instruments. I am also a registered basketball official with the state of Michigan but will register here in Texas as well, I have been officiating for 15 yrs. I have also done packaging, inspecting and some fork-lift driving. I enjoy working with hand tools specifically for woodworking which I like to do as a hobby when I can which is a craft I would definately like to improve on because I enjoy doing it. I also have a chauffer’s liscense.

Dusty answers:

Yes they should hire you

Sandra asks…

What do you think of this poem?

It has taken about 2 years to complete as i had to wait for something new to pop into my head.

The Old Cobbler

The Old Cobbler was pounding soles at 9
And was wealthier by 10 when sleep took him at 5

Twas strange indeed when at the stroke of 3
came a knock from that crafty old man

The oil fueled light made golden the night
and cast shadows on the old oak floor

As the old devil stepped the boards they all wept
from the weight of his timeless cries

Old Cobbler awoke as the devil he spoke
and asked “What brings the Father of Lies?”

“A pair of shoes I require that can withstand the fire
and outrun the good lord above.”

“Oh Devil you see just a simple a cobbler I be
and an agent of death isn’t free.”

“I offer you rewards for your shoes that beat Lords
and I give you one year to impress me.”

The oil shadows danced ’round this sad circumstance
as the poor cobbler questioned his needs

He looked to and fro at the tools in a row
as he pondered these profitable deeds.

His decision was cast and the one year did pass
And the Cobbler he came to a rest

My bones they are sore and can make shoes no more
Now these shoes for the devil are complete

A knock at the door and in walked the whore
With Bare feet and finery replete

You made your decision to build the shoes I commissioned
And I am here to collect my prize

The Cobbler looked up from his half empty cup
To see nothing but death in those eyes

With the best of my skill these shoes I did build
But they will only last a night

And your window of chance is coming up fast
For these shoes will dissolve in the light

Now the devil there stood, bare feet on wood
In his pickle he did surmise

“Old man” he spoke, “is this some kind of joke,
Do you doubt what’s before your eyes?

Of me you asked to build shoes so fast
And these are lovingly crafted with sin

But the lords light will shatter the night with a clatter
Oh devil I can’t help you win.

I did my best and fulfilled your request
And honored the terms of our deal

The Devil smiled and sat awhile
And knew that all was sealed

Reflect in his eyes a moth that flew by
The cobbler, his breath was a roar

And the cobbler’s pact he did retract
With not a little conceit

With a plume of smoke the silence was broke
And the Old Man was there no more……

Dusty answers:

Creative, Describing, Cool, Amazing more words to say but overall, AWESOME!

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