Carpenter Tools

Quality Carpenter Tools Will Help You Create Masterpieces

Posts Tagged ‘college’

IRWIN Tool Challenge_South Birmingham College- Construction



IRWIN Tool Challenge – South Birmingham college construction campus
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Your Questions About Wood Crafting Tools



Mandy asks…

Looking to open an occult shop in Tucson around January. What would be good to see there?

I want to know what items you use in your practice. Also, please list any category or title you feel fits you (example: neo-pagan which includes wicca, pagan, satanist, etc).

I ask this question because we all have a different perspective on the world and the way such things should be conducted. I know my way and my favored items, but there maybe something that I don’t use that you would like to see. Also, we are all from different cultures and I tend to have somewhat of a western perspective, I don’t wish to exclude any because of my own faults.

I’m not a fan of doing things half-assed. The idea of having pewter castings and plastic beads anywhere in my store just annoys me. I am not opening a shop for pretty souvenirs. I also believe that magic is a very personal thing and should be tailored to fit an individual by an individual rather than deciding that one symbol is the only good one.
I’d like to see people from all walks of life enjoy the merchandise, not just a particular crowd.

Some items that I already plan on stocking:
A large variety of herbs, I believe my order is somewhere over 100 to start with.
Pill casings, ointment bases, and witch hazel
Variety of bottles and jars for ointments, medicines, and other uses
Incenses
Essential Oils
Crystal bowels, plates, and goblets (like malachite, quartz, jasper, and etc.)
A few wooden bowels
Petrified wood
A medium to large assortment of gems and minerals (including some of the less mainstream ones like kyanite, celestite, and circle stone)
Beeswax sheets (in many colors)
Beeswax candles (in many colors)
Candles from animal fats (in many colors)
Parchment paper and homemade paper
India ink and maybe supplies for making your own inks
Leather
Leather bound books (both plain and crystal encrusted)
Just a few various sized daggers (wood, horn, or silver handled, some crystal encrusted)
Wood boxes of various woods with an assortment of different metal closures
Carving Tools
Leather working tools
One or two seals (wax stamps)
An assortment of jewelry (all silver, gold, and possibly a few other semi-precious metals)
There will also be some small artifacts like beads and figurines from different parts of the world.

I’d also like to include a small book section. These would be pretty much all trade related books and reference books. I do not wish to include anything like “the basics of wicca” or “book of shadows for beginners”. I wish rather to focus on the crafting side of working with your own goods as well as the reference section on anatomy, gems and minerals, and herbs. I might add some books on older cultures if I find some good ones.

As a final note:
It may not happen in the first few months, but there will be a back room for invitation only that will store older and stronger items. Expect these things to be of a higher quality and of a higher price.

Dusty answers:

People love to look good so find things that would make people image look good

William asks…

Starting woodworking as a hobby, advice?

I just graduated college and am interested in beginning woodworking as a hobby. It is just for fun but I would also like to design and build my own furniture for my future home- well built pieces that could last me the rest of my life and that I can be proud of. I have some questions, please answer if you can or just general advice would be appreciated. Thanks!

I am interested in learning how to build with hand tools, but if I wanted access to a wood shop for larger tools such as table saws and lathes, how can I do this without buying these expensive machines? Are there any public wood shops that let you pay for time in the shop? ( I live in Southington, CT and couldn’t find anything on google).

Do you recommend any books or materials to help me learn the craft? I usually learn through self teaching, but I’d like to learn the right way, specifically with detail work and how to correctly use certain tools.

Have any of you found clubs or organizations a good way to learn tricks and meet fellow woodworkers?

Dusty answers:

In our neighborhood (California) there is a community college with a very nice woodshop, and you can take a ‘lab’ class there that just gives you time in the shop to work on whatever you’d like. There are even machine shops (metal) where you can rent lathes and mills by the hour. Check around to see if there’s something like that there.

Hand tools are not that expensive (well, really good ones are but you don’t need really good ones right away). Saws, chisels, planes, etc. Look at flea markets and ‘antique’ stores, I’ve bought a lot of tools there very reasonably priced, especially old planes that are still good. It would still be nice to have a table saw, and maybe a router. And an electric drill, of course.

Look at woodworking magazines. They have projects and plans that show you how, for instance, a chest of drawers is built. Or a table. When you get an idea of what pieces go where, you can design them yourself. I was already a CAD user (Computer Aided Drafting) and that really helps. There are also some very good books on woodworking, beginning to advanced, with project ideas, etc. I found a big thick book (500 pages) on the remainders table for like $300 called ‘An Enyclopedia of Furniture’ and has designs for hundreds of pieces–simpler styles like Shaker, Arts & Crafts, but also fancy stuff that I wouldn’t even try (and don’t like anyway).

I started small, with boxes. You can make them out of scraps or even discarded pallets. There are lots of ways to put boxes together, so you get practice at joinery, plus they’re really useful in various sizes, and if you can’t use them you’ll have no trouble giving them away. 8^) Besides, lots of furniture is just boxes, like desks, cabinets, etc. A chest of drawer is a big box full of smaller boxes.

Sharon asks…

Thor’s Hammer… Hand crafted!?

Alright, so I really want to hand craft a hammer out of wood, or using beads…
but I need some proper instruction on doing so.
Though, I do not have any reference, and every time I type something up in google… it all ends up being something like: “buy it on eBay now!!” I’d rather make something than buy something, unless I need to buy the tools or the materials in doing so for this process.

So, I am asking my fellow Yahooligan’s if there’s any instruction you can help me on finding some good instruction on making a Mjolnir.

Please, if you would kindly help?!

Dusty answers:

Here’s some general info on forging techniques. The RR Tools section only briefly mentions hammers, and it would be nothing like a war hammer anyway

http://www.anvilfire.com/iForge/

Otherwise, I could only find passing mention of hammer forging. Note that a war hammer *Head* closely resembles a modern nail hammer or ballpeen hammer – not the big, chunky sledge hammer you see in the comics. The main difference with a war hammer is the very long handle (which is why it was of such import that Mjolnir was forged with a too-short handle, meaning that it required greater strength to wield it effectively).

Jim

Ruth asks…

Thor’s Hammer… Hand Crafted?!?

Alright, so I really want to hand craft a hammer out of wood, or using beads…
but I need some proper instruction on doing so.
Though, I do not have any reference, and every time I type something up in google… it all ends up being something like: “buy it on eBay now!!” I’d rather make something than buy something, unless I need to buy the tools or the materials in doing so for this process.

So, I am asking my fellow Yahooligan’s if there’s any instruction you can help me on finding some good instruction on making a Mjolnir.

Please, if you would kindly help?!
It’s a bead I am trying to make!

Dusty answers:

Try to find a picture of one by looking up Norse Mythology.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Related Reading: