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Posts Tagged ‘bench’

Add a drawer to your work bench 1 2 3



Easy way to add a drawer to your work bench or anywhere else.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

The Firepit Bench



This video shows the journey of building a firepit bench using only hand tools.

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California Carpenter Episode 2



Making a tool bench out of tanks old boat/lumber rack.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Day 5 I love Gold! Caves, Armor



More Minecraft here! www.youtube.com In this Episode of day 5 i cover: How to prepare for exploring in caves in minecraft you need: wood for chest and craft bench iron armor torches cobblestone to build iron sword iron pick axe iron shovel food to regenerate life! how to make iron pants how to make iron hat (helmet) how to make iron shoes (boots) how to make iron shirt (vest) searching in caves how to mine for diamonds (y axis between 11 – 18) lighting a cave so monsters dont spawn finding gold how to find gold in minecraft how to find iron how to find coal how to cook gold ore how to cook iron ore
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Your Questions About Woodworking Tools



Steven asks…

I need to build a workbench?

I’m an amateur woodsmith and my next project is to build a decent workbench. I don’t have a lot of tools or money for materials but want a solid bench. Does anyone know where I can find plans for a bench of this nature. I’ve surfed the diy sites and woodworking sites and all i find are extremely complicated plans. Thanks.

Denny answers:

There are some easy plans on these sites:

http://www.workbenchdesign.net/

http://www.freeww.com/workbenches.html

http://www.handymanusa.com/articles/workbench.html

http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_journal/woodworking/1273396.html

Good luck…

Lizzie asks…

Is this too much? I have a new BF of a month or so and we are exchanging Christmas gifts. I got him a gift?

card to Lowes (he loves woodworking), offered to take him to a local museum that has a woodworking tool exhibit, told him I’d pay for a woodworking seminar at a local shop, got him Jet Li’s “Fearless” DVD and made his family cookies. Uh, now I’m thinking that’s overkill. He hasn’t even given me my gift yet. Was it too much? Guys, what would you think if you were him?

Denny answers:

Y0UR iDEA WAS REAllY SWEET BUT MAYBE Y0U 0VER DiD iT JUST A liTTlE BiT..i W0UlD HAVE STUFF WiTH JUSS THE GiFT CARD M0ViE AND C00KiES. BUT M0ST B0YZ APPRECiATE ANYTHiNG S0 HE PR0BABlY FEElS REAllY SPECiAl THAT Y0U G0T HiM A l0T 0F STUFF..G00D lUCK WiTH THE RElATi0NSHiP♥

Carol asks…

I am looking for some free information blueprints etc.. to make log furniture (chairs,bed, tables)?

I also would like information on finding bargains on tenon makers or other tools necessary. I am new to woodworking but just inherited some tools and have always been interested any help would be appreciated.

Denny answers:

Try this site:

http://www.smithindustries.com/How-To.html

This company offers a book and video on building log furniture:
http://www.lhgic.com/

Lisa asks…

what should i get for family members! info down below!!!!!:))))))))?

dad-he loves woodworking and tools and gardening

Mom- Jewelry,little decorations and cute little things

16 yr old bro- loves video games scary movies and things like that

14 yr old sister- loves designer everything clothes jewelry anything like that

7 year old twin little brothers- love video games and cool legos and stuff like that

also are there any cute things i should ask for for myself………..(up to 50 for each one) (one big one $500)

and for my bros and sis up to $30 or less would b better

Denny answers:

Dad- Your dad would love a new, advanced Swiss Army Knife ($60.95)

http://www.wengerna.com/evogrip-18-16814

Mom- These earrings are so chic and adorable, your mom won’t be able to help loving them ($38.00)

http://www.anthropologie.com/anthro/catalog/productdetail.jsp?id=19638196&parentid=BAYNOTE

16 yr old bro- He’d loved this funny scary t-shirt ($19.95)

http://www.snorgtees.com/friday-the-12th

14 yr old sister- To meet your sister’s need to wear designer garb from head to toe without breaking the bank, get her these Juicy Couture undies ($18.00)

http://www1.bloomingdales.com/catalog/product/index.ognc?ID=503465&CategoryID=2910

7 year old twin little brothers- These lego walkie talkies will be a hit with your brothers! They’ll be forced to share them which ensures that you don’t have to get them each an individual present. Therefore, you avoid a situation in which they might be fighting over the other’s gift ($28.00)
http://www.urbanoutfitters.com/urban/catalog/productdetail.jsp?itemdescription=true&itemCount=80&startValue=1&selectedProductColor=&sortby=&id=16742348&parentid=SHOP_GIFTSBYTYPE8&sortProperties=+subCategoryPosition,&navCount=288&navAction=jump&color=&pushId=SHOP_GIFTSBYTYPE8&popId=SHOP_GIFTSBYTYPEGATEWAY&prepushId=&selectedProductSize=

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My review of the major league woodworking tool pack



This set includes a bench mallet, marking gauge and a pair of paring blocks and is a good value for aspiring hand tool woodworkers. In a fitted box and around 0, this set would make a great gift if you know anyone interested in woodworking.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Woodworking Tools : How to Sharpen Wood Lathe Tools



When sharpening wood lathe tools, a bench grinder or a slow-speed grinder can be used, but a slow-speed grinder helps to keep the tools cooler. Find out how to sharpen and clean up gouges with help from an experienced woodworker in this free video on woodworking tools. Expert: Dave Trull Contact: www.trullgallery.com/ Bio: Dave Trull has been in the woodworking business for 18 years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
Video Rating: 4 / 5



Steven asks…

I want to learn how to build things from wood!?

I have always had a love for things made out of wood. I recently purchased a bunch of tools for woodworking at an estate sale. I purchased a mitre saw, table saw, scroll saw, circular saw, plunge router, and many hand tools and clamps. There is just one problem!! I don’t know how to start!! I have never made anything or even used these type of tools before. What is the best way to start making stuff from wood? I bought a couple of woodworking magazines but I think I must be too dumb because I can’t always figure out what there talking about. Maybe I need it explained like it is for a kid or something. Or is it really that hard to be starting from square one to be a woodworker.
I don’t know anyone that does that type of stuff

Dusty answers:

Don’t worry about starting from square one. Everyone has to start there.
First, always use safety precautions. Wear eye protection and hearing protection when using the power tools. Next thing, have someone instruct you on proper use of the power saws. They are very dangerous if used incorrectly. I would go to the local Lowes or Home Depot and see if they are having seminars that you can attend. If there is a vocational school nearby, see if they have a class on woodworking. Look in the yellow pages for a cabinet making shop. Go there and talk to some of them and see if someone there would be willing to “school” you on proper use of the power tools. They could come to your house and show you on your own tools so you can become familiar with their operation. Be prepared to pay for that.
As for building something, start with a box. Then go from there. You need to learn how to read a tape measure accurately. Know what every mark on the tape means. There is much more but that will get you started.

Paul asks…

Can you go over my answers?

Ok I was asked to write 2 causes and effects for this story (below). My mom just left for a business trip which SUCKS! She usually checks over my work before I turn it in. I know the story is LONGGG but it’s really interesting. Here it is, when your done can you look over my answers?

I was twelve when I really started learning about time. I spent a week during my summer vacation building a bench with an older boy named Tony. The bench now sits near the train station in my hometown. Whenever I return, I drive to the station to watch weary commuters collared by time sit on the bench and observe life passing by.Tony was my grandparents’ neighbor. I’m ashamed to admit it, but I was more interested in spending time with Tony than in spending time with my grandparents. Tony had a real talent for woodworking, and he had a set of tools that looked ancient yet perfectly at home in his young hands.The bench we built was made entirely from an old moss-covered walnut log we found behind Tony’s woodshed. We spent the last three days of my vacation scrambling to complete the bench. Countless times I told Tony and my grandfather, who would pop in to check our progress, that we didn’t have to finish right away. But my grandfather would have none of that. He grew up in an era in which time and resources were precious and counted in lives and lost opportunities, not in days, hours, or minutes. In this respect, Tony and my grandfather were alike. Tony seemed wise beyond his years, as if he held answers and secrets deep within him. We had no plans, no pictures to go by. Tony envisioned the bench and then went to work. “Let’s mill the log into planks, Jess,” Tony commanded. “We’ll rip the boards to width and cut them to length.”
I learned a new language and how to see the uniqueness within common objects. We planed planks into smooth rails and elegant slats. We cut joints that were tight and strong. I like to think now that Tony and I were joined that week, not only by the common goal of finishing the bench, but also by something much stronger than any joint cut with a saw or chisel. Parched and tired, we took periodic breaks. “Jess, go fetch a couple pops from da ‘frigerator,” Tony would bark. We’d sip the cold, fizzy liquid and yell like kids at neighbors and passing cars. Occasionally the summer air was punctuated by roaring motorcycles. “Whooooo, boy, Jess” he’d yell at me. “That’s the motorsickle fer me.” We finished the bench and it sat in my grandparents’ garage for some time. They eventually donated it to the town. Tony, I learned, had joined the army. Only recently did I learn why he never returned to claim the bench. Today, I tell my son about Tony and how we built the bench. I show him Tony’s tools, which I now have, with handles worn dark and hard from the hands of a boy who ran out of time. And together we search old woodsheds for another moss-covered black walnut log with a secret buried within.

Cause #1: The grandfather grew up in an era where no time could be wasted
Effect #1: Since the grandfather thought no time should be wasted, he encouraged the boys to finish the bench.

Cause #2: Jess admired Tony for everything he did, especially woodworking.
Effect #2: Since Tony was great at woodworking, Jess decided to spend A LOT of time with Tony to finish a bench.

Can you please check them?

Dusty answers:

Yep, that’s correct!

Mark asks…

Directions: Read the passage below and answer the questions that follow.?The Station Bench?

Directions: Read the passage below and answer the questions that follow.?The Station Bench?
Directions: Read the passage below and answer the questions that follow.?
The Station Bench

I was twelve when I really started learning about time. I spent a week during my summer vacation building a bench with an older boy named Tony. The bench now sits near the train station in my hometown. Whenever I return, I drive to the station to watch weary commuters collared by time sit on the bench and observe life passing by.
Tony was my grandparents’ neighbor. I’m ashamed to admit it, but I was more interested in spending time with Tony than in spending time with my grandparents. Tony had a real talent for woodworking, and he had a set of tools that looked ancient yet perfectly at home in his young hands.
The bench we built was made entirely from an old moss-covered walnut log we found behind Tony’s woodshed. We spent the last three days of my vacation scrambling to complete the bench. Countless times I told Tony and my grandfather, who would pop in to check our progress, that we didn’t have to finish right away. But my grandfather would have none of that. He grew up in an era in which time and resources were precious and counted in lives and lost opportunities, not in days, hours, or minutes. In this respect, Tony and my grandfather were alike. Tony seemed wise beyond his years, as if he held answers and secrets deep within him.
We had no plans, no pictures to go by. Tony envisioned the bench and then went to work.
“Let’s mill the log into planks, Jess,” Tony commanded. “We’ll rip the boards to width and cut them to length.”
I learned a new language and how to see the uniqueness within common objects.
We planed planks into smooth rails and elegant slats. We cut joints that were tight and strong. I like to think now that Tony and I were joined that week, not only by the common goal of finishing the bench, but also by something much stronger than any joint cut with a saw or chisel.
Parched and tired, we took periodic breaks.
“Jess, go fetch a couple pops from da ‘frigerator,” Tony would bark.
We’d sip the cold, fizzy liquid and yell like kids at neighbors and passing cars. Occasionally the summer air was punctuated by roaring motorcycles.
“Whooooo, boy, Jess” he’d yell at me. “That’s the motorsickle fer me.”
We finished the bench and it sat in my grandparents’ garage for some time. They eventually donated it to the town. Tony, I learned, had joined the army. Only recently did I learn why he never returned to claim the bench.
Today, I tell my son about Tony and how we built the bench. I show him Tony’s tools, which I now have, with handles worn dark and hard from the hands of a boy who ran out of time. And together we search old woodsheds for another moss-covered black walnut log with a secret buried within.

1. In what ways were Tony and the narrator’s grandfather alike? (1 point)
They were both skilled woodworkers.
They understood how valuable time is.
They were both from military families.
They both liked motocycles.
2. What is a valid prediction one might make about the narrator? (1 point)
He will try to find Tony.
He will take the bench home with him.
He will move back to his hometown.
He will build another bench.
3. When Tony said, “That’s the motorsickle fer me,” he meant that was the motorcycle he (1 point)
once had.
now owns.
wants to own.
can’t have.
4. What is the theme of this passage? (1 point)
Time can always be recaptured.
Time is something precious.
People measure time differently.
Time moves faster as people get older.
5. Which of the following BEST summarize why the narrator visited the train station to look at the bench? (1 point)
The station helped the narrator think about his childhood.
The bench reminded the narrator of his grandparents.
The station was once an important place in the narrator’s life.
The bench represented a significant part of the narrator’s life.
6. What does the narrator mean when he says the commuters are “collared by time”? (1 point)
They have many trains to ride.
They have no sense of time.
They have schedules they must keep to.
The have missed the last train home.
7. What does the narrator mean when he states, “He grew up in an era in which time and resources were precious and counted in lives and lost opportunities…?” (1 point)
He grew up during very tough times.
He learned to tell time in a different manner.
He doesn’t know how to keep track of time.
He lost many relatives when he was a child.
8. What did you learn about Tony from the way he talked to Jess?
(1 point)
Tony was very respectful and considerate.
Tony was not sure of himself or what he was doing.
Tony considered himself in charge.
Tony thought of Jess as his equal in the project.
9. What kind of relationship did the narrator have with Tony? (1 point)
They were cousins.
They were strangers.
They were enemies.
They were friends.
10. What does the narrator mean when he says that his “grandfather would have none of that”?
(1 point)
His grandfather did not want to help build the bench.
His grandfather did not want to hear talk of not finishing the bench.
His grandfather did not like Tony’s design ideas.
His grandfather did not like Tony’s ordering his grandson around.
11. Which of the following is not a run-on sentence? (1 point)
He went home, he was not feeling well.
She ran two miles she was training for the next track meet.
She got a job because she needed extra money.
They won the prize they got the highest score.
12. Which is the best way to combine these sentences?

It is almost over. We will try to get in. (1 point)
It is almost over, we will try to get in.
It is almost over while we will try to get in.
It is almost over whereas we will try to get in.
Although it is almost over, we will try to get in.
13. In the following compound sentence, where is a comma needed?

I would ride my bike but it has a flat tire. (1 point)
after would
after has
after but
after bike
Think about the events in the passage and the actions of the characters. For 14 list an an example of a cause, for 15 list an example of the effect from the cause of 14 to display your knowledge of cause-and-effect relationships.
List a cause for 16 and its effect for 17 as well.
14. List a cause.
(2 points)

15. List the effect of your cause from 14. (2 points)

16. List a cause. (2 points)

17. 15. List the effect of your cause from 16.
(2 points)

Dusty answers:

You have posted this Q quite a few times! DO UR HOMEWORK!! You probably do connections academy because that’s what I do and I’ve seen a lot of my same quizzes on here (all posted by you) You are clearly using Yahoo Answers for doing your homework don’t take advantage of Yahoo Answers.

Chris asks…

Directions: Read the passage below and answer the questions that follow.?

The Station Bench

I was twelve when I really started learning about time. I spent a week during my summer vacation building a bench with an older boy named Tony. The bench now sits near the train station in my hometown. Whenever I return, I drive to the station to watch weary commuters collared by time sit on the bench and observe life passing by.
Tony was my grandparents’ neighbor. I’m ashamed to admit it, but I was more interested in spending time with Tony than in spending time with my grandparents. Tony had a real talent for woodworking, and he had a set of tools that looked ancient yet perfectly at home in his young hands.
The bench we built was made entirely from an old moss-covered walnut log we found behind Tony’s woodshed. We spent the last three days of my vacation scrambling to complete the bench. Countless times I told Tony and my grandfather, who would pop in to check our progress, that we didn’t have to finish right away. But my grandfather would have none of that. He grew up in an era in which time and resources were precious and counted in lives and lost opportunities, not in days, hours, or minutes. In this respect, Tony and my grandfather were alike. Tony seemed wise beyond his years, as if he held answers and secrets deep within him.
We had no plans, no pictures to go by. Tony envisioned the bench and then went to work.
“Let’s mill the log into planks, Jess,” Tony commanded. “We’ll rip the boards to width and cut them to length.”
I learned a new language and how to see the uniqueness within common objects.
We planed planks into smooth rails and elegant slats. We cut joints that were tight and strong. I like to think now that Tony and I were joined that week, not only by the common goal of finishing the bench, but also by something much stronger than any joint cut with a saw or chisel.
Parched and tired, we took periodic breaks.
“Jess, go fetch a couple pops from da ‘frigerator,” Tony would bark.
We’d sip the cold, fizzy liquid and yell like kids at neighbors and passing cars. Occasionally the summer air was punctuated by roaring motorcycles.
“Whooooo, boy, Jess” he’d yell at me. “That’s the motorsickle fer me.”
We finished the bench and it sat in my grandparents’ garage for some time. They eventually donated it to the town. Tony, I learned, had joined the army. Only recently did I learn why he never returned to claim the bench.
Today, I tell my son about Tony and how we built the bench. I show him Tony’s tools, which I now have, with handles worn dark and hard from the hands of a boy who ran out of time. And together we search old woodsheds for another moss-covered black walnut log with a secret buried within.

1. In what ways were Tony and the narrator’s grandfather alike? (1 point)
They were both skilled woodworkers.
They understood how valuable time is.
They were both from military families.
They both liked motocycles.
2. What is a valid prediction one might make about the narrator? (1 point)
He will try to find Tony.
He will take the bench home with him.
He will move back to his hometown.
He will build another bench.
3. When Tony said, “That’s the motorsickle fer me,” he meant that was the motorcycle he (1 point)
once had.
now owns.
wants to own.
can’t have.
4. What is the theme of this passage? (1 point)
Time can always be recaptured.
Time is something precious.
People measure time differently.
Time moves faster as people get older.
5. Which of the following BEST summarize why the narrator visited the train station to look at the bench? (1 point)
The station helped the narrator think about his childhood.
The bench reminded the narrator of his grandparents.
The station was once an important place in the narrator’s life.
The bench represented a significant part of the narrator’s life.
6. What does the narrator mean when he says the commuters are “collared by time”? (1 point)
They have many trains to ride.
They have no sense of time.
They have schedules they must keep to.
The have missed the last train home.
7. What does the narrator mean when he states, “He grew up in an era in which time and resources were precious and counted in lives and lost opportunities…?” (1 point)
He grew up during very tough times.
He learned to tell time in a different manner.
He doesn’t know how to keep track of time.
He lost many relatives when he was a child.
8. What did you learn about Tony from the way he talked to Jess?
(1 point)
Tony was very respectful and considerate.
Tony was not sure of himself or what he was doing.
Tony considered himself in charge.
Tony thought of Jess as his equal in the project.
9. What kind of relationship did the narrator have with Tony? (1 point)
They were cousins.
They were strangers.
They were enemies.
They were friends.
10. What does the narrator mean when he says that his “grandfather would have none of that”?
(1 point)
His grandfather did not want to help build the bench.
His grandfather did not want to hear talk of not finishing the bench.
His grandfather did not like Tony’s design ideas.
His grandfather did not like Tony’s ordering his grandson around.
11. Which of the following is not a run-on sentence? (1 point)
He went home, he was not feeling well.
She ran two miles she was training for the next track meet.
She got a job because she needed extra money.
They won the prize they got the highest score.
12. Which is the best way to combine these sentences?

It is almost over. We will try to get in. (1 point)
It is almost over, we will try to get in.
It is almost over while we will try to get in.
It is almost over whereas we will try to get in.
Although it is almost over, we will try to get in.
13. In the following compound sentence, where is a comma needed?

I would ride my bike but it has a flat tire. (1 point)
after would
after has
after but
after bike
Think about the events in the passage and the actions of the characters. For 14 list an an example of a cause, for 15 list an example of the effect from the cause of 14 to display your knowledge of cause-and-effect relationships.
List a cause for 16 and its effect for 17 as well.
14. List a cause.
(2 points)

15. List the effect of your cause from 14. (2 points)

16. List a cause. (2 points)

17. 15. List the effect of your cause from 16.
(2 points)

Dusty answers:

And what will you have learned if I answer this for you?

And why on earth did you post your English homework in History?

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